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20121006
20121014
STATION
CSPAN2 6
KQED (PBS) 4
WETA 4
WMPT (PBS) 4
CSPAN 2
CNN 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
with that -- "american oracle' the civil war in the civil rights era which brings this new ones exploration into the 20th century. as we approach this as quick -- sesquicentennial blight brings to light for american writers with their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the civil war, how they grappled with the issues it raised and how they influenced public memory and commemoration of the board to varying degrees. for writers like features, southern novelists and essayists robert can want he would come to recant his view of the civil war as a lost cause, midwestern historian bruce catton whom andrew and company calls it sort of literary norman rockwell in part because his capacious works on the civil war were widely read at the middle of the century, northern elite and literary critic edwin wilson who looked at the war in terms of his own pacifism often neglecting the world of race and it and the northern novelist and essayist james baldwin who was the most acute essayist and thinker of race on the american psyche hands down working at that time. blight said in an interview with the chronicle
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 12:00am PDT
military leaders, businesses, as well as civil rights organizations. >> ifill: and this laib test whether any of those kind of things matter, i suppose. >> absolutely. >> ifill: marcia coyle. >> ifill: ray suarez has more on the larger stakes and potential fallout arising from today's arguments. >> suarez: and for that, we turn to two people who have been a big part of the national conversation surrounding this case. debo adegbile is the acting president and director-counsel of the n.a.a.c.p. legal defense and educational fund, which filed an amicus brief in this case. and richard kahlenberg is a senior fellow at the century foundation. he wrote a recent report arguing for race-neutral admission policies that he says foster diversity. you were at the court, debo. what's at stake under coming classes of rising freshmen and their families seeking admission to public universities in this case? >> well, the stakes are very high. it's clear that everybody recognized today that diversity in higher education is a compelling interest. it's something that benefit all the-- all the students benefit
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 12:00pm EDT
, he had his right arm amputated after the civil war. and here is one of him as a father, his grandsons and sons follow them into military service, this is very late in life for him. finally, and ultimately, a group shot that shows him right there, along with all the great men of the time who formed the board for bowdoin college. the chamberlain who also, to civil war service, was shown in this picture. he is right there. so those are the two gentlemen. chamberlain and howard were two years apart. chamberlain was class of 52, howard was class of 50. he did share a dorm, but not a dorm room. so we really don't know too much in the early years about whether they were friendly. certainly, later in life, they were. finally, a picture of howard along with other distinguished alums, including chief justice [inaudible name], next to howard, who is also here at bowdoin. this is a nice, gentle motion of the late 19th century. social life in a small town in maine. this is a letter from christmas morning, 1861, howard at the time was in camp california, which is out of the outset of washington dc.
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 1:00am EDT
shared by both the civil rights and gay rights movements. this is about 30 minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much. good evening, washington. thank you for that warm welcome. my amazing mom is here from arkansas this evening. [applause] while i have my doubts, she has assured me that she is not just here to see a cirque du soleil performance. [laughter] it is a real honor to be introduced at my first national dinner by two families who have inspired me since the darkest days of proposition 8. chris and sandy, paul and jeff, thanks to your determination to tell your stories, today, we are all poised to witness history when the supreme court strikes down proposition 8 and restores marriage equality in the most populous state in america once and for all. [applause] it is such an exciting time to be part of this organization and this movement. we are making history, we are witnessing progress that many of us thought we might never see in our lifetimes. men and women in the military serving openly with honesty and dignity. 35 million, 35 million americans living in a state where they are fr
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
strong. you know, right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war, the army expanded to, you know, 3 million people, two and a half million or so in the north, and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary, and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts, treasonnist behavior and so on. although, he didn't pursue every case or serve on every case himself, obviously, a lot of court marshalls on the field and so on, it was his responsibility to make sure as much as he could justice was prevailing in the cases and that punishment was meeted out as it should be and people's rights were protected. it is a massive assignment way past the end of the war. he stayed in that position until 1875 so-dramatically expanded position, and he also had the role in that position of making law, so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war of the likes which the united states had never seen. to many, many policies around how the war should be conducted and so it needed
CNN
Oct 11, 2012 7:00am EDT
folks lived the civil rights movement. i hope it happens there. at
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 9:00pm PDT
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 8:00pm EDT
's equality. civil society is wise to remain vigilant and to exercise their hard-earned rights to safeguard their new democracy. like the hundreds of tunisian women who recently took to the streets to protest on behalf of a woman charged with indecency after she was raped by a police officer. these competing visions of tunisia's future were put to the test. violent extremists attacked the u.s. embassy in tunis and burn the american school nearby. how did the good the tunisian people in government respond? first, the government increase increased security around our embassy and promised to assist with repairs to the school, which they have done. then they publicly committed to confront violent groups and prevent tunisia from becoming a safe haven for international terrorism. following through on these pledges is essential. those responsible for the attacks must be brought to justice. the government must provide security for diplomatic missions and create a secure environment for foreign residents and visitors, and the rule of law must extend to everyone throughout the country. the country's
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 1:00pm EDT
. >> they do that, don't they, with torture? right. does that make it better? >> criminal is very different from civil. and what we -- the precise argument we are making here is that the presumption against application of u.s. law to conduct within foreign sovereigns -- and remember, the purpose of the presumption, justice scalia, is to avoid conflict with foreign sovereigns. there is no foreign sovereign over the high seas. the conflict arises, and the presumption protects against this conflict, when we go into a foreign nation, we project our law. >> i understand that. that's the worst. but i really don't -- you appeal to the general principle of territoriality of our laws. and, as i say, i don't know any other case where that principle allows our securities laws to be applied on the high seas, for example -- >> well -- >> even though they can apply in australia. >> your honor, if you wish to say no extraterritorial application, we think sosa does not foreclose that, because sosa simply said piracy might be one of the actions covered. but i want to get back to the key point, which is -- >
KCSMMHZ
Oct 9, 2012 9:30am PDT
was converted and use for civil defense purposes and left to deteriorate further. you could do something with it if you have 5 million euros to spare, and just as importantly, the right idea. real-estate agent cornelia shell specializes in selling properties like these. some potential buyers seem to have rather unrealistic notions. >> people frequently tell me they would like to have a spacious home. when i want it might be a bit too spacious, they add that they were thinking about bringing it along their mother-in-law as well. imagine -- that is around 2000 square meters. you do not have to use it all, but at least 1000 square meters on the ground floor and first floor. that is the equivalent of at least five single-family dwellings. and you have to be able to pay for the maintenance of all of that. >> she has now found a credible potential buyer, but it is all about location. >> often, they are not in the right surroundings. for example, if a park has been partly turned into allotments, or if there is it that founding built nearby, which is a growing problem, then that sounds a death k
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 12:00pm EDT
universal rights and create space for civil society, a message i delivered at the highest level in a person in february. now what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month's violence revealed strains of extremism that threatened those nations as well as the broader region and even the united states. on the other hand we've seen actions that would have been hard to imagine a few years ago. the democratically elected leaders and free people in the arab countries standing up for a peaceful pluralist future. it is way too soon to see how these transitions will play out. but what is not in doubt is that america has a big stake in the outcome. last month at the united nations general assembly in new york, i met with leaders from across the region. and i told each of them that the united states will continue to pursue a strategy to support emerging democracies as they were to provide effective security grounded and the rule will fall to spur economic growth and bolster space institutions. we have made those three priorities the hallmark of america's
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 9:00am EDT
a revolution, if i do it, what is going to happen? another civil war or what is going to happen, what is he going to bring about? the second one is that one of the most important things, and i think hugh roberts this morning was right i think, is that there is no coordination between, you know, of the social economic and political grievances. for there is no opposition that is capable of channeling the socioeconomic grievances and turning them into political demands. if you recall and 2011 you had more or less to movement. one that was make social economic demands and then a smaller one, and it was nicknamed -- you know, went ahead of the rcp was making demonstrations and had some political demands, you know, he was ridiculed just because there's no anchorage. opposition, i think algiers is one of the few countries and work with the opposition never expires to come to power. i'm very serious. you have a political party, they criticize but they don't aspire to come to power. th only one that was capable of coming to power was the fif. the regime was extremely astute and not allow that. and s
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)